Android cpu usage info

 

Since Android can be installed on wide range of devices, I'm wondering how important RAM and the CPU speed are to the performance of a device. There are always tradeoffs when something is increased and another one decreased!

Is more RAM or a faster processor better for general browsing and less mulititasking? What if I'm interested in gaming or doing lots of things at once? Will more RAM make up for a slower processor or vice-versa?

In the context of Android, more RAM means Android can keep more sleeping program in the RAM so they will be ready to be quickly resumed when you return back to the apps. More RAM means Android is going to spend less of its time killing and reloading apps from the internal memory/sd card, and instead spend more time doing actual work you care about. This means that more RAM usually give you better/faster task-switching. Also, more RAM means your homescreen is less likely to be killed; and you won't experience that 10-second-wait-that-feels-like-forever. Having more RAM also allows you to run complex apps that naturally requires a lot of memory, e.g. photo/video editor, complex games, etc.

Android cpu usage info

Android Studio is the official Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for Android app development, based on IntelliJ IDEA . On top of IntelliJ's powerful code editor and developer tools, Android Studio offers even more features that enhance your productivity when building Android apps, such as:

This page provides an introduction to basic Android Studio features. For a summary of the latest changes, see Android Studio Release Notes .

Each project in Android Studio contains one or more modules with source code files and resource files. Types of modules include:

Since Android can be installed on wide range of devices, I'm wondering how important RAM and the CPU speed are to the performance of a device. There are always tradeoffs when something is increased and another one decreased!

Is more RAM or a faster processor better for general browsing and less mulititasking? What if I'm interested in gaming or doing lots of things at once? Will more RAM make up for a slower processor or vice-versa?

In the context of Android, more RAM means Android can keep more sleeping program in the RAM so they will be ready to be quickly resumed when you return back to the apps. More RAM means Android is going to spend less of its time killing and reloading apps from the internal memory/sd card, and instead spend more time doing actual work you care about. This means that more RAM usually give you better/faster task-switching. Also, more RAM means your homescreen is less likely to be killed; and you won't experience that 10-second-wait-that-feels-like-forever. Having more RAM also allows you to run complex apps that naturally requires a lot of memory, e.g. photo/video editor, complex games, etc.

The version history of the Android mobile operating system began with the release of the Android alpha in November 5, 2007. The first commercial version, Android 1.0, was released in September 2008. Android is continually developed by Google and the Open Handset Alliance , and it has seen a number of updates to its base operating system since the initial release.

Versions 1.0 and 1.1 were not released under specific code names, but since 2009's Android 1.5 Cupcake, Android versions have had confectionery-themed code names . Each is in alphabetical order, with the most recent major version being Android 7.0 Nougat, released in August 2016. [1]

There were at least two internal releases of the software inside Google and the OHA before the beta version was released. [3] [4] The code names Astro Boy and Bender were used internally for some pre-1.0 milestones. [5]

Android Debug Bridge (adb) is a versatile command-line tool that lets you communicate with a device (an emulator or a connected Android device). The adb command facilitates a variety of device actions, such as installing and debugging apps, and it provides access to a Unix shell that you can use to run a variety of commands on a device. It is a client-server program that includes three components:

adb is included in the Android SDK Platform-Tools package. You can download this package with the SDK Manager , which installs it at android_sdk /platform-tools/ . Or if you want the standalone Android SDK Platform-Tools package, you can download it here .

When you start an adb client, the client first checks whether there is an adb server process already running. If there isn't, it starts the server process. When the server starts, it binds to local TCP port 5037 and listens for commands sent from adb clients—all adb clients use port 5037 to communicate with the adb server.