Android locator 5zigen fn01r c

 

Android device owners that use location-related services and apps a lot, and would like to track and access their own location for a change , can do so on Google Maps by going to location history.

One reddit thread discusses how Android device users can view their location history “minute-by-minute” by going to this Google Maps URL: maps.google.com/locationhistory . There, you can browse location history by day, which should show up on a map, assuming that you have location services enabled on your device.

Because Google does the actual tracking of your location, you’d have to agree to Google monitoring that data for you in order for the service to work. Otherwise, you’ll get a blank map, as shown below:

Android locator 5zigen fn01r c

I have installed a few Android applications both with the adb install MyApplication.apk command and via a webserver (like an alternative to Android Market).

But where in the Android file system on my phone is the MyApplication.apk file placed? Are applications installed with adb install not placed in the same directory as applications downloaded from the Market?

I found some applications on /system/app but I can't recognize them as some downloaded from Android Market or the one I have installed with adb install .

Android device owners that use location-related services and apps a lot, and would like to track and access their own location for a change , can do so on Google Maps by going to location history.

One reddit thread discusses how Android device users can view their location history “minute-by-minute” by going to this Google Maps URL: maps.google.com/locationhistory . There, you can browse location history by day, which should show up on a map, assuming that you have location services enabled on your device.

Because Google does the actual tracking of your location, you’d have to agree to Google monitoring that data for you in order for the service to work. Otherwise, you’ll get a blank map, as shown below:

Android doesn’t come with a “find my Android” feature, so there’s no official way to track your phone if you lose it. You should prepare your phone for loss by setting up such a tracking app — but what if you didn’t?

Your first instinct may be to download Lookout’s Plan B , which has been the go-to app for this purpose. However, Plan B only runs on Android 2.3 Gingerbread and lower, so modern Android phones will require a new solution. If you are still running 2.3 or lower, you should definitely check it out, but everybody else can keep reading.

Most lost-phone-tracking Android apps must be set up ahead of time. However, there’s a reason Plan B works (if you have a Gingerbread device, at least). That’s because Android allows you to remotely install apps — click the Install button on the Google Play website and the app will be remotely downloaded to your device, assuming it’s turned on, connected to the Internet, and configured to use the same Google account. If the app can set itself up, you should be able to remotely locate your phone.