Gaia gps topos and tracking v3 0 android

 

I’ve been testing two GPS navigation devices this summer: a higher-end GPS unit and a smartphone app that has very good maps. Except for having a longer battery life and being waterproof, I can’t see what the value is in having a dedicated $400+ GPS versus using the GPS on your smartphone with a ~$15 mapping and tracking application and an extra battery or recharger for longer trips.

One battery is enough to use all this for a whole day of walking. I always carry one original spare battery, a cheap external 2-cell (“5600mAh”) charger enough for 2 full charges when on long trips, and I think I’ll just quit using whole day track recording if I go to remote places for a long time, which will allow me to use one battery for 2-3 days of navigation. If I could oftenly go into wild for more than 3 days, I would buy a cheap non-original spare battery for each day of a trip – it may be the best balance of energy/weight/cost (not ease of use obviously), at least theoretically.

Weight measurements if someone is interested: phone with battery and protective case is 6oz, spare battery – 1.24oz, 2-cell universal charger with short microUSB cable – 4.85oz, waterproof clear case is about 1oz. So my kit for 1-2 days weights 8.24oz, for 3 days or more – 13.1oz.

Gaia gps topos and tracking v3 0 android

After my first post about the DeLorme inReach Explorer and SE , in which I recommended the SE over the Explorer, I was contacted by a DeLorme Product Manager who wanted to share additional information about the devices. While I stand by my SE recommendation, I would like to add nuance to the conversation: hardware differences, plus two reasons to buy the Explorer instead of the SE.

Both units are widely available from outdoor retailers. If you wish to support informative content like this post, please buy from Amazon.com or from one of the vendors below.

Despite being the same size and weight, the inReach SE and Explorer do not have the same hardware profiles, and thus have different capabilities. This explains why the inReach SE, which was released first, cannot be upgraded to Explorer-like functionality through a simple software update.

I’ve been testing two GPS navigation devices this summer: a higher-end GPS unit and a smartphone app that has very good maps. Except for having a longer battery life and being waterproof, I can’t see what the value is in having a dedicated $400+ GPS versus using the GPS on your smartphone with a ~$15 mapping and tracking application and an extra battery or recharger for longer trips.

One battery is enough to use all this for a whole day of walking. I always carry one original spare battery, a cheap external 2-cell (“5600mAh”) charger enough for 2 full charges when on long trips, and I think I’ll just quit using whole day track recording if I go to remote places for a long time, which will allow me to use one battery for 2-3 days of navigation. If I could oftenly go into wild for more than 3 days, I would buy a cheap non-original spare battery for each day of a trip – it may be the best balance of energy/weight/cost (not ease of use obviously), at least theoretically.

Weight measurements if someone is interested: phone with battery and protective case is 6oz, spare battery – 1.24oz, 2-cell universal charger with short microUSB cable – 4.85oz, waterproof clear case is about 1oz. So my kit for 1-2 days weights 8.24oz, for 3 days or more – 13.1oz.

The fourth generation of Garmin’s Fenix GPS sport watch will replace the current Garmin Fenix 3  and Fenix 3 HR . Release date is March 2017. The three models vary in both size and features:

You might be asking, What happened to the Fenix 4? The rep did not go into details, but referenced (completely seriously) the perception of bad luck in Asia.

The Fenix 5 is the most direct upgrade from the 3-series. The Fenix 5S, as in “small,” is for those who want less bulk on their wrist, whether due to fit or aesthetics. And the Fenix 5X has an over-sized face so that it can better display maps. More on that shortly.

This is the town guide I use when I hike the PCT.  I  save it as a PDF on my smart  phone.   I try to keep things current but there could be mistakes and things change.  Send updates and corrections to [email protected]

Thru-hiker permit
  It’s my understanding that a thru-hiker permit is not required to thru-hike the PCT.   It is only offered as a convenience so you don’t need to get separate permits for different areas where permits are required.  Permits are not required for a lot of the trail.   If you get checked it will probably be in the Sierras so I’d have one by then.   If you can’t get one for the day you want to start—I wouldn’t sweat it.   If you want one and the PCTA won’t give you one for when you want to start you can contact http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/cleveland/home/?cid=FSEPRD488307 for one.

California fire permit “You must have a California Campfire Permit to use a stove, lantern, or campfire outside a developed campground or recreation area.”