Buy spy apples

 

We get THE BEST apples you can buy anywhere in Tennessee! That’s because they come from the north, where crunchy, juicy-sweet apples grow. And our apples come from small family farms that care about their growing practices and follow an IPM (Integrated Pest Management) protocol to minimize their use of pesticides. Sometimes, we offer organic apples, too.

We offer apples starting in September and usually through December. You can see what’s available now by checking our current order forms , or sign up on our email list , and we’ll notify you when it is time to order.

There are so many beautiful and tasty apples to choose from; it can be hard to choose. We hope this brief introduction to each juicy treat will help you decide which one’s best for you. Our recommendation is that you get fresh eating apples and canning apples early in the season (September/October) and then get your storage apples later on (October/November). There will be fewer varieties to choose from in November/December/January as the orchard sells out of certain varieties earlier in the season, so don’t wait ’till the last minute if you’re after a certain kind of apple.

Buy spy apples

With apple-picking season hard upon us, it’s time to dust off your favorite apple pie recipe, sharpen your crust-rolling skills, and get ready to enjoy fall’s favorite dessert: apple pie.

You may be tempted to make your pie from one of the six apple varieties that dominate the domestic market year-round: Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Gala, Fuji, Granny Smith, and McIntosh.

And I’ll confess ahead of time that my favorite apple is any of the brown-green russets — Golden Russet, Roxbury Russet, et al.

We get THE BEST apples you can buy anywhere in Tennessee! That’s because they come from the north, where crunchy, juicy-sweet apples grow. And our apples come from small family farms that care about their growing practices and follow an IPM (Integrated Pest Management) protocol to minimize their use of pesticides. Sometimes, we offer organic apples, too.

We offer apples starting in September and usually through December. You can see what’s available now by checking our current order forms , or sign up on our email list , and we’ll notify you when it is time to order.

There are so many beautiful and tasty apples to choose from; it can be hard to choose. We hope this brief introduction to each juicy treat will help you decide which one’s best for you. Our recommendation is that you get fresh eating apples and canning apples early in the season (September/October) and then get your storage apples later on (October/November). There will be fewer varieties to choose from in November/December/January as the orchard sells out of certain varieties earlier in the season, so don’t wait ’till the last minute if you’re after a certain kind of apple.

This fruit based dessert has the same flavors as apple pie without the guilt of a fattening crust, clocking in at around 200 calories a piece!

“My oh my this is so easy! I did this early this morning with my 6 and 3 year old girls as a treat for after dinner tonight.”

“They love cooking with me. The pictures and memories fill our kitchen and dining room walls! The house smells so good! I can not wait to eat them!”

When it comes to apple brandy, the first country you think of might be France with its famed Calvados, but thanks to a crop of small distillers, the U.S. is now one of the most exciting producers of the historic spirit.

The first and most important thing to know about apple brandy is that it must be made from apples and nothing else. Typically, a blend of different apple varieties are mashed into juice, which is then fermented, distilled, aged (or not), and bottled. Some producers distill single-variety batches of apples instead of blending to create brandy that explores the nuance of a single apple type. Others mix a percentage of apple distillate with neutral grain spirits for a result that can't technically be called apple brandy—instead, it's known as applejack. Applejack generally has a thinner apple flavor, while the concentrated brandy has a richer, more complex personality.

Unlike its cousin Calvados, American apple brandy doesn't play by a strict set of rules. Calvados must be produced in the Normandy region of France and must be aged in oak casks for at least two years. For this reason, it's usually pretty heavy on the wood flavors. American producers, on the other hand, often favor a more natural approach, showcasing the fruit's inherent apple-ness instead. American apple brandy also typically comes in one of two forms—those aged in various kinds of barrels, and those that land on the fresh un-aged side of the spectrum typically called eau de vie.