Mobile spy reviews rise of the planet apes sci

 

Mobile spy reviews rise of the planet apes sci

I had arranged to meet Stella Rimington, the former head of MI5, in a London gentleman's club – the sort of place where the chairs are leather, the walls panelled and the newspapers on sticks. She is photographed in one of the main rooms, as befits her status as the grand Dame of the security service, but from 10am non-members, viz women, are allowed only in a distant 'library'.

Experience of an intelligence-gathering nature proves an essential asset in locating this, and once Rimington, with me in tow, has caromed through peg-lined cloakrooms, slotted into cranking lifts and orienteered along complicated corridors, the displacement begins to seem a suitable metaphor for her professional life: central to the Establishment and yet, by necessity, kept tucked away in a distant room on the third floor.

Rimington is Britain's most famous spy, the first woman to rise to the top of MI5 and the first director general to be publicly named: a double whammy. Her career, which spanned 25 important years and covered all three branches of the service (counter-espionage, counter-subversion and counter-terrorism) involved her, Zelig-like, in many of the key events and social changes of the second half of the 20th century.