Blackberry analysis monitoring and troubleshooting tools

 

I’ll be honest: I haven’t been as excited about an upcoming Android phone as much as I am for the BlackBerry Mercury in a while. Amidst the samey goodness of most recent Android releases, the BlackBerry Mercury is weird, wonderful and increasingly looking to be a compelling prospect. On that front, the latest rumor claims it may share the same camera sensor used by the smartphone camera king du jour, the Google Pixel.

The information comes from typically reliable leaker Roland Quandt , revealing the Mercury will use the Sony IMX378 sensor with 12 MP resolution and support for 4K video. On the front, there will reportedly be one of two sensors used, either a Samsung S5K4H8 or an Omnivision OV8856, both with 8 MP resolution, 1.12 micron pixel size and supporting Full HD video at 30 fps. Quandt also reconfirms what Evan Blass reported six months ago, that the Mercury will be powered by the Snapdragon 625 chipset.

Of course, as we’ve all learned from past experience, camera hardware is only half the equation where picture quality is concerned. Poorly implemented software processing can utterly gimp a smartphone camera’s capabilities. Take the wheels off a Ferrari and its top speed won’t blow your mind either. So the quality of the Mercury’s camera in relation to the Pixel will entirely hinge on whether or not BlackBerry/TCL Communications are able to nail image processing.

Blackberry analysis monitoring and troubleshooting tools

BlackBerry is a line of smartphones and services designed and marketed by Canadian company BlackBerry Limited (formerly known as Research In Motion Limited). [1]

BlackBerry was considered one of the most prominent smartphone vendors in the world, specializing in secure communications and mobile productivity. At its peak in September 2013, there were 85 million BlackBerry subscribers worldwide. [2] [3] However, BlackBerry has since lost its dominant position in the market due to the success of the Android and iOS platforms; the same numbers had fallen to 23 million in March 2016. [4]

The BlackBerry line traditionally uses a proprietary operating system developed by BlackBerry Limited known as BlackBerry OS . In 2013, BlackBerry introduced BlackBerry 10 , a major revamp of the platform based on QNX operating system. BlackBerry 10 was meant to replace the aging BlackBerry OS platform with a new system that was more in line with the user experiences of modern smartphone operating systems. The first BB10 powered device was the BlackBerry Z10 , which was followed by other all-touch and keyboard-equipped models; including the BlackBerry Q10 , BlackBerry Classic , BlackBerry Passport , and the BlackBerry Leap .

I’ll be honest: I haven’t been as excited about an upcoming Android phone as much as I am for the BlackBerry Mercury in a while. Amidst the samey goodness of most recent Android releases, the BlackBerry Mercury is weird, wonderful and increasingly looking to be a compelling prospect. On that front, the latest rumor claims it may share the same camera sensor used by the smartphone camera king du jour, the Google Pixel.

The information comes from typically reliable leaker Roland Quandt , revealing the Mercury will use the Sony IMX378 sensor with 12 MP resolution and support for 4K video. On the front, there will reportedly be one of two sensors used, either a Samsung S5K4H8 or an Omnivision OV8856, both with 8 MP resolution, 1.12 micron pixel size and supporting Full HD video at 30 fps. Quandt also reconfirms what Evan Blass reported six months ago, that the Mercury will be powered by the Snapdragon 625 chipset.

Of course, as we’ve all learned from past experience, camera hardware is only half the equation where picture quality is concerned. Poorly implemented software processing can utterly gimp a smartphone camera’s capabilities. Take the wheels off a Ferrari and its top speed won’t blow your mind either. So the quality of the Mercury’s camera in relation to the Pixel will entirely hinge on whether or not BlackBerry/TCL Communications are able to nail image processing.

(Note to self:  I really should not call the by-product of juicing “waste” because we feed it to our chickens and they were some kinda’ happy to get blackberries!)  

The Sure-Jell directions as well as our Ball Canning Recipe Book both were VERY emphatic about not making a double batch and that the measurements needed to be exact, so I ended up making six individual batches of blackberry jelly.   

Step Two.  Put Jars in large canning pot for the water bath to get them hot and lids in the smaller pot to keep them hot.