Cell phone emergency 911 location

 

Hazard: The recalled cell phones that are in a no-service area and display an "out of range, try again later" message could fail to connect to emergency 911.

Description: This recall involves "Jitterbug" cell phones model numbers SPH-a110 and SPH-a120 with standard key pads and version BB14 software. No other Samsung wireless phones or software versions are included in this recall.

Sold through: Directly to consumers through targeted national advertisements and publications, electronics and drug stores nationwide, and on the Web at www.jitterbug.com from March 2008 through May 2009 for about $150.

Cell phone emergency 911 location

Nearly every day, there are roughly 650,000 emergency calls to 9-1-1 all assuming help will be there in a matter of minutes.

Anderson knew her exact location, but despite the 9-1-1 operator's best efforts, the system couldn't accurately locate Anderson in time.

Mario Bryant oversees the Boynton Beach 9-1-1 Communications Center, "We spend half the time on a call just confirming where the caller is."

Hazard: The recalled cell phones that are in a no-service area and display an "out of range, try again later" message could fail to connect to emergency 911.

Description: This recall involves "Jitterbug" cell phones model numbers SPH-a110 and SPH-a120 with standard key pads and version BB14 software. No other Samsung wireless phones or software versions are included in this recall.

Sold through: Directly to consumers through targeted national advertisements and publications, electronics and drug stores nationwide, and on the Web at www.jitterbug.com from March 2008 through May 2009 for about $150.

Adding an ICE ("In Case of Emergency") contact to your phone can help emergency personnel can locate a friend or family member who can speak on your behalf if you become unconscious or incapacitated. This simple idea was developed by a British paramedic, Bob Brotchie, who recognized the need for speed when emergency personnel need to get information about a patient or contact next of kin.[1] For people with preexisting medical conditions and allergies, in particular, keeping your emergency contact information close at hand could help save your life!

Enhanced 911 , E-911 or E911 is a system used in North America that links emergency callers with the appropriate public resources. Three-digit emergency telephone numbers originated in the United Kingdom in 1937 and have spread to continents and countries around the globe. Other easy dial codes, including the 112 number adopted by the European Union in 1991, have been deployed to provide free-of-charge emergency calls.

In North America, where 9-1-1 was chosen as the easy access code, the system tries to automatically associate a location with the origin of the call. This location may be a physical address or other geographic reference information such as X/Y map coordinates. The caller's telephone number is used in numerous manners to track a location that can be used to dispatch police, fire, emergency medical and other response resources. Automatic location of the emergency makes it faster to locate the required resources during fires, break-ins , kidnappings , and other events where communicating one's location is difficult or impossible.

In North America the incoming 9-1-1 call is normally answered at the Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) of the governmental agency that has jurisdiction over the caller's location (see #Location below). When the 9-1-1 call arrives at the appropriate PSAP, it is answered by a specially trained official known as a Telecommunicator . In some jurisdictions the Telecommunicator is also the dispatcher of public safety response resources. When a landline call arrives at the PSAP, special computer software uses the telephone number to retrieve and display the location of the caller in near real-time upon arrival of the call.